Artists

To request more information, please
write to info@southkiosk.com

James Bulley

James Bulley, Progress Music, 2014 (installation view)
James Bulley, Progress Music, 2014 (installation view)

For Progress Music, South Kiosk has commissioned a new sound and film work by artist James Bulley. The piece draws on archive film material that was once broadcast across the screens of the nation, in an attempt to demonstrate the changes that were occurring in architecture, industry and culture, shown through a generative, film and sound installation. The rhythm of the film is defined according to the behaviour of an ever-changing sound score, which composes the film in real-time from a repository of thousands of archival fragments. The 9-channel installation is presented in such a way that the viewer becomes positioned within the material, as opposed to merely a spectator of footage from a bygone era.

The sound score will echo the bombastic brass and drum that has become synonymous with this era, but as an archivist at the Daphne Oram Archive, Bulley will also seek to reflect the new ground covered in post-war England by electronic experimentalists such as those working as part of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Alongside his installation, Bulley has created a visual score, available as a limited edition print, that offers an interpretation of the structure of the piece.

Edition

Progress Music I, 2014
black aqua art ink screen printed on heritage wood free 315 gsm printmaking paper, 42 × 59.4 cm

Emma Charles

Fragments On Machines #16, 2013
fuji crystal archive matt- ctype 40.6 × 50.8 cm or 50.8 × 76.2 cm

Through photographs and videos both crisp and evocative, Emma Charles goes beneath the urban veneer to uncover the hidden infrastructure within our technologically driven modern life. She is particularly interested in the places where opposites collide.

In her film, Fragments on Machines (2013), for example, she takes viewers behind Verizon’s New York headquarters, where her camera ranges over thickly bundled fiber-optic cables and racks of servers, revealing the overtly physical means by which our virtual reality is delivered. She has also highlighted the nightshift workers who clean up after traders in London’s houses of finance in After the Bell (2009). By revealing these unseen spaces and people, Charles aims to give us a more nuanced, and perhaps sympathetic, understanding of how modern life is structured.

Emma Charles’ work explores metropolitan spaces of productivity that are hidden from the public eye, primarily focusing on the more ethereal elements of industry and corporate environments. Fragments On Machines reveals the physical framework and materiality of the Internet, a vast network often thought and spoken about solely in abstract terms. nd Verizon’s New York headquarters, where her camera ranges over thickly bundled fiber-optic cables and racks of servers, revealing the overtly physical means by which our virtual reality is delivered. She has also highlighted the nightshift workers who clean up after traders in London’s houses of finance in After the Bell (2009).

Edition

Fragments on machines #18, 2013
fuji crystal archive matt- ctype 40.6 × 30.5 cm or 50.8 × 40.6 cm

Fragments on machines #20, 2013
fuji crystal archive matt- ctype, 40.6 × 30.5 cm or 50.8 × 40.6 cm

Fragments on machines #22, 2013
fuji crystal archive matt- ctype, 25.4 × 30.5 cm or 40.6 × 50.8 cm

Fragments on machines #23, 2013
fuji crystal archive matt- ctype, 25.4 × 30.5 cm or 40.6 × 50.8 cm

Felicity Hammond

Restore to Factory Settings, 2014

Photographer and installation artist Felicity Hammond is fascinated by “political contradictions within the urban landscape,” she says. Employing crisp and occasionally unusual darkroom techniques, she catalogs construction sites and obsolete built environments, transforming each landscape into a lush and troubling tableau that recalls the meticulous composition of a still life painting. Propelled by the precariousness she senses in our post-industrial economy, she seeks to distill everyday detritus into a sense of longing. Through her luminous prints and videos, she finds potent allegory in subjects such as abandoned power stations and construction equipment. Recent work locates her dystopian sensibility in the collision of digital and physical formats, as in a recent series that sets manufacturing tools against the blue of a blank computer screen.

Edition

Restore to Factory Settings (folly 1), 2014


Restore to Factory Settings (folly 2), 2014


Gareth Owen Lloyd

Heliograph EIT 171 [2014/03/13 01:00], 2014
digital c-type print, framed, uv glass, 57 × 67 cm

Mixed-media artist Gareth Owen Lloyd employs installation, film, photography, performance, collaborations, and events, as well as science fiction and a mixture of outmoded and cutting-edge technology, to present meditations on our present and future. In addition to maintaining his own practice, he collaborates with other thinkers and artists through his work with the design collective MoreUtopia!, and through his role as co-director of the artist-run space FoodFace. The role of art and artists in society is among Lloyd’s chief concerns, which he fleshed out in a multipart, multimedia project envisioning the art and artists of the future. In his words: “An artist could be anything in the future and may not even exist. [An artist] is a kind of barometer of a context.”

His Heliograph series was created using a surveying tool which he built by combining networked digital screens, enlarger parts and photographic paper. Using this out-of-time apparatus, he exposes a realtime-feed from the solar and heliospheric observatory onto light sensitive paper, creating prints that demonstrate the alchemical properties of photography.

Edition

Heliograph EIT 284 [2014/03/13 01:00], 2014
digital c-type print, framed, uv glass, 57 × 67 cm

Heliograph EIT 171 [2014/03/13 01:00], 2014
digital c-type print, framed, uv glass, 57 × 67 cm

Heliograph EIT 284 [2014/03/13 01:00], 2014
digital c-type print, framed, uv glass, 57 × 67 cm

Joachim Sefzick

DE A61 -1, 2014 (installation shot)
lightbox mdf, led light source, fuji tran, 8×202×6cm or 15×501×22cm

Strongly rooted in place, Joachim Sefzick’s atmospheric photographs are meditations on the aftereffects of unfettered growth. Highlighting seemingly banal landscapes and unremarkable corners of urban life, his work is occasionally compared to Michael Wolf, whose photographs of Hong Kong’s “architecture of density” portray the monotony of rapid development. Sefzick is drawn to post-recession Europe—its highways and government housing, abandoned villages and roadsides. In his early work, Florian, Sefzick detailed the minor variations among identical low-income houses, while in Requiem he documented abandoned German villages. His eye seeks that which is, in his words, “forgotten or about to be forgotten.”

More recently, he has experimented with time and space within a single image, superimposing photographs of buildings taken from multiple perspectives on one another and building long, glowing light boxes that contain images of desolate highways taken from a slow-moving car.

Edition

DE A61 -1, 2014
lightbox mdf, led light source, fuji tran, 8×202×6cm or 15×501×22cm

DE A61_2_layer, 2014
lightbox mdf, led light source, fuji tran, 8×202×6cm or 15×501×22cm

GB M1 - 3, 2014
lightbox mdf, led light source, fuji tran, 8×202×6cm or 15×501×22cm

GB M2 - 1, 2014
lightbox mdf, led light source, fuji tran, 8×202×6cm or 15×501×22cm